Army Counterintelligence Agent Awarded Lint Center Scholarship

Lint Center for National Security Studies announces the winner of its Patrick M. Hughes, Lieutenant General, U.S. Army, Retired Inspiration Scholarship

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit organization focused on supporting the next generation of America’s National Security professionals through scholarship and mentoring opportunities, today announced the award of the Patrick M. Hughes, Lieutenant General, U.S. Army, Retired Inspiration Scholarship.

Chief Warrant Officer 4 Richard Sanders, a veteran Army counterintelligence agent, is this year’s scholarship winner. Over the course of his career, CW4 Sanders has deployed six times to conflict areas around the world, serving in both staff and leadership capacities, and has been awarded the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, and the Knowlton Award. He holds a BA in History from the University of Maryland and is currently pursuing a Master’s in Organizational Leadership from Johns Hopkins. CW4 Sanders’ 17 years of distinguished service in Army counterintelligence differentiated him from the Lint Center’s other scholarship applicants.

Recipients of the award receive $500 towards education in national security or intelligence studies.

“I’m honored to have received the Patrick M. Hughes, Lieutenant General, U.S. Army, Retired Inspiration Scholarship,” said CW4 Sanders. “I’m grateful to the Lint Center for considering my application, and I hope to honor Gen. Hughes’ name by relentlessly pursuing excellence as I continue to move my career forward. I’m beyond humbled.”

In addition to his impressive career, CW4 Sanders’ scholarship essay was instrumental in the committee’s decision. He examined Alexander the Great, his conquests, and how a frayed relationship with his father fueled a constant drive to prove himself to be the better man. “This type of investigation into causes and motivators is required in the counterintelligence field,” said Mr. James Lint, Chairman of the Lint Center. “CW4 Sanders’ study of Alexander the Great’s psyche during his years of conquest exemplifies the type of creative and analytical thinking the committee looks for when awarding scholarships. That, and his already impressive service career speaks to the quality of CW4 Sanders as a national security worker.”

The Lint Center announced the Patrick M. Hughes scholarship in February 2016 to honor the legacy of General Hughes’ and his leadership over the course of his career. After 35 years of active duty service, General Hughes embarked on federal civilian service, as well as a private consultant, federal contracting executive, and contractor. The Lint Center hopes his life story and this scholarship will embolden the next generation of emerging leaders to follow Lieutenant General Hughes path in the national security career field.

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

Value and Handling of Prisoners in World War I

Published with Permission by:
Lori S. Tagg, Command Historian,
US Army Intelligence Center of Excellence, Fort Huachuca, AZ.

“Prisoners or deserters constitute one of the most fruitful sources from which information of the enemy is obtained.”
Intelligence Regulations, American Expeditionary Forces, October 21, 1918

By the time of the Armistice ending World War I on November 11, 1918, the US held nearly 48,000 prisoners of war. The majority had been captured within the final months as the war moved out of the trenches.  The American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) G-2, Maj. (later Maj. Gen.) Dennis Nolan put much emphasis on the information obtained from enemy prisoners. After the war, he remarked, “[A prisoner] can, as a rule, tell you much more than a spy…who is trying to get around and find out about the enemy.  [A prisoner] knows and the other man is frequently guessing at it.”

In mid-October 1918, Capt. Ernst Howald (standing right), the lead interrogator for the 28th Division, Second US Army, used prisoner statements to construct a detailed template showing the enemy facing the division. After the war, his estimates were proven to be highly accurate.

As Nolan shaped his formal intelligence organization in the early months of American involvement, he recognized prisoners could be captured any time on any battlefield, and commanders at every echelon wanted to examine the prisoners they captured.  He also realized that, due to a lack of personnel and the high operating tempo, in-depth interrogations at lower echelons were not practicable or effectual.  Nolan developed a hierarchical system for the examination of prisoners at all echelons and outlined clear guidelines for handling prisoners in the 1918 Intelligence Regulations and Instructions for Regimental Intelligence Service. Those same guidelines were published in the Army’s first (provisional) Combat Intelligence Manual, also printed in 1918.

Nolan’s system started at the regiment.  The Regimental Intelligence Officer, typically a first lieutenant, determined the name, rank, and organization of any prisoners, as well as the time and place captured.  Prisoners were searched and then quickly transferred to division assembly points.  The division G-2 sections, led by a lieutenant colonel or major, conducted limited questioning, with the help of commissioned linguists from the Corps of Interpreters.  This questioning focused on necessary tactical information about the division sector to a depth of two miles behind the enemy front lines.

From the division, prisoners were transferred to the corps collecting centers, where more in-depth questioning began.  The number of prisoners, especially during offensive operations, often stressed the corps G-2 sections.  At those times, Army headquarters dispatched teams of four sergeants and one officer to augment the corps’ interrogation efforts.  During the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives in the fall of 1918, French interrogators also supplemented the US interrogators.

The corps intelligence sections found that simple and direct questioning, combined with kindness and courtesy, was the most effective method for eliciting information.  Many of the AEF’s interrogators had been lawyers in their civilian lives and could coax information out of the most recalcitrant prisoner.  Corps interrogators used a variety of other tactics to elicit information, as well.  One interrogator found that he could get prisoners to talk openly if he showed them aerial photographs with landmarks they recognized. The II Corps G-2, Col. “Vinegar Joe” Stilwell, recruited a drafted German soldier, who had previously lived in the United States and yearned to return there, to “work the prisoner cages” and glean information from his fellow prisoners.  Additionally, US interpreters donned German uniforms and wandered the collection points to eavesdrop on prisoners bragging about intentionally misleading their interrogators.  This use of “stool pigeons” was common practice throughout the war.

The quality and veracity of the information varied with the rank of the prisoner.  Lt. Col. Walter Sweeney, who served in the AEF G-2 during the war, claimed that “noncommissioned officers were by far the best sources for gaining information” and “few of them resisted insistent interrogation.”  About 60 percent of officers “invoked military honor” and refused to cooperate.  A typical German soldier had little knowledge about the larger battlefield, but he provided details on his own unit, weapons, troop losses, and general morale.  Enemy soldiers from Poland, Denmark, the Alsace-Lorraine region and southern Germany were particularly cooperative.  Unquestionably, the most important information obtained from prisoners was enemy order of battle, but they also gave up their routes of movement; the position and condition of trenches, dugouts and wire entanglements; their capacity to attack; and how susceptible they were to being attacked.

Based on the preceding outline, it is clear that World War I was no different than any other war in US Army history: prisoners of war have always been proven and valued sources of intelligence.  However, formalizing and standardizing the process for handling and examining prisoners in the 1918 Intelligence Regulations and provisional manuals was one more step in modernizing US Army Intelligence.  While field manuals published in 1940 provided more details on accepted interrogation techniques, the system for prisoner-of-war handling Nolan developed for World War I continued, with minor changes, throughout the 20th century.

Scholarship Winner Naheed Vadsaria Publishes Book

Tajik Hope: Reflections on Engaging Women in Kapisa Province.
by Naheed Vadsaria

Naheed Vadsaria is currently an MBA Candidate at at Johns Hopkins University. She won the Lint Center’s ‘Lee and Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness’ Scholarship and wrote about how communication can be a difficult aspect of National Security for her essay submission. She was the Recipient of Non-Article 5 NATO Medal, Superior Civilian Service Award, and French Brigade Ministry of Defense and Veterans Commander Commendation Award. She also Co Authored an article on Brazil’s Silent Resolution: http://www.diplomaticourier.com/brazils-silent-revolution

She published an ebook titled: Tajik Hope: reflections on engaging women in Kapisa province. A short summary can be found below:

The ebook discusses her work and interactions with Tajik Women in Kapisa Province, Afghanistan, while she worked as a Social Scientist with the Department of Army’s Human Terrain System in Afghanistan. As a Social Scientist, she was embedded with French Brigade Task Force Lafayette (TFLF). It was here where she conducted operationally relevant research and analysis on major socio-cultural issues affecting TFLF’s area of operations. She also worked with Provincial Reconstruction Team Kapisa’s ad hoc Female Engagement Teams and Kentucky Agricultural Development Team to identify and collaborate with local Women’s Shura (councils) and key female leaders residing in Nijrab District, Kapisa Province, Afghanistan.

The ebook Tajik Hope includes a series of case studies that can be used to broaden the lens of Coalition Forces’ (CF) perception and widen Western Audiences’ understanding of how women in Afghanistan might be understood and engaged. Although most interviews conducted throughout the case studies were conducted with ethnic Tajik women, this ebook is intended to serve as a sociocultural awareness tool to assist CF in understanding how they can respectfully interact with Afghan women, including key female leaders and Women Shura. The document provides key conclusions drawn from each case study. Throughout these case studies are Holy Qur’anic Surahs and Hadiths, which support Afghan women’s rights in accordance to Islam.

Here is a link to the ebook: http://www.diplomaticourier.com/2016/03/08/tajik-hope-reflections-on-engaging-women-in-kapisa-province-2/

New Operations Manager

It is with great pleasure that we can say that Amber Antony will become the new Operations Manager here at the Lint Center. Congratulations Amber!

Amber began at the Lint Center a little over two years ago as a volunteer/internship application screener and then moved on to screening scholarship applicants and eventually managing all of the scholarship screenings. She was then promoted to the Volunteer Coordinator position and then to HR Manager in 2016. While at the Lint Center she created the Lint Center Scholarship Screening Standard Operating Procedures, oversaw and assisted with the screening of over 100 volunteer applicants which assisted in increasing the size of the Lint Center’s volunteer base. In addition to this, During a contest to name a new scholarship given by a donor, her write up of great grandfather, Ira Dale Smith, Chief Petty Officer, US Navy (Ret.) was selected to have a scholarship named after him.

Thank you Amber for your service to the Lint Center and we appreciate all that you have done. We look forward to seeing you in this new position!

Thanks,
The Lint Center

A Memorial Day Message from The Lint Center

This Memorial Day, the Lint Center honors those American’s who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in service of our country. Originally recognized at “Decoration Day,” this commemoration dates back to 1868 where people across the nation recognized the fallen from the Civil War. It’s original date of May 30th was chosen because it was not on the anniversary of any Civil War battle and was later moved to the last Monday of May to provide a three-day weekend for federal employees. Although many of us are fortunate enough to enjoy this long holiday weekend, let us not lose focus on what this day is about. Today is about taking the time to reflect and honor those heroes who paid the ultimate sacrifice to protect our great nation. We must never forget them or their families.

Yale Doctoral Candidate Recognized with Lint Center Scholarship

Lint Center for National Security Studies Awards Winter 2017 Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. Scholarship

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., a non-profit organization focused on supporting the next generation of America’s National Security professionals through scholarship and mentoring opportunities, today announced the award of the 2017 Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. scholarship.

Torey McMurdo, a Yale doctoral candidate, was awarded the Lint Center’s Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. scholarship for her continued and demonstrated commitment to advancing national security. The Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. scholarship provides $1,000 to recipients pursuing scholastic study in fields related to alliance building, counterintelligence, cultural understanding, and national security studies

“It is a distinct honor to receive the Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. scholarship and the support of the Lint Center,” said Ms. McMurdo. “This scholarship will assist with data collection and interviews for my doctoral dissertation on information warfare, particularly in Europe. Staff Sgt. Eaton spent his youth just a stone’s throw from my current residence in New Haven, CT, so this scholarship resonates especially strongly. I look forward to earning this honor by emulating his standards and character both academically and professionally in the years ahead.”

Ms. McMurdo’s winning essay established a clear understating of cyber-attacks and technological vulnerabilities facing the United States. Her previous experience working with Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to advise companies on national security issues resonated with the scholarship committee.

Gold Star mother, Sharon Noble Eaton, said “I had the honor and great pleasure of enjoying luncheon with and presenting my son’s Lint Center for National Security scholarship (in memory of Army SSG Richard S. Eaton) to Torey McMurdo, a native of California, current Ph.D. candidate at Yale University. Her Ph.D. research targets the real-world threats of cybersecurity and cyber conflict.  Torey has and will use her gifts of intellect, integrity, leadership, determination and humanity to make significant contributions in (national security). The world will be a safer place because of people like Torey McMurdo.”

Mrs. Sharon Eaton (right), mother of Army SSG Richard S. Eaton, presenting the Winter 2017 Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. Scholarship to Torey McMurdo (left).

“Torey has all the makings of a good intelligence professional,” said James R. Lint, CEO of the Lint Center. “That is a high bar to achieve and she has a great background that will allow her to grow. The scholarship is named for a great comrade in arms, Rick Eaton, who constantly pushed himself. I believe Torey will follow his lead and remember him whenever faced with a challenge.”

Due to the generosity and continued support of Stratfor, the world’s leading geopolitical intelligence platform (www.stratfor.com), Torey McMurdo will also receive a one-year subscription to Stratfor Worldview which includes industry leading geopolitical analysis, and rigorous forecasting of emerging global developments.

This press release was prepared by Lint Center Volunteer, Elizabeth Monila. 

About Stratfor:

As the world’s leading geopolitical analysis platform, Stratfor brings valuable context to global events, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. By leveraging a deep understanding of history, politics and geography in conjunction with our unique methodology, Stratfor delivers informed perspectives on today’s events and develops a more accurate view of the future. Individual subscriptions and enterprise membership are available at Stratfor.com.

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit http://www.lintcenter.org/.

MBA Candidate at Johns Hopkins University Receives Lee and Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit organization focused on supporting the next generation of America’s National Security professionals through scholarship and mentoring opportunities, today announced the award of the Winter 2017 Lee and Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship.

Naheed Vadsaria, a Technical Trainer/Information Assurance Specialist for Harris Information Technology Systems and MBA candidate at Johns Hopkins University, was awarded the Lint Center’s Lee and Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship for her continued and demonstrated commitment to advancing national security.

“I am truly honored to be the recipient of the Lee and Byun Scholarship International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship,” said Naheed Vadsaria. “I would like to thank the Lint Center for National Security Studies for recognizing the research and analysis work I conducted as a Social Scientist with the Department of Army, Human Terrain Systems in Kapisa, Afghanistan. This scholarship will help me pave my path towards pursuing a career in national security, specifically focusing on Cyber Security. I am looking forward to leveraging the Lint Center’s mentorship program and working with this dynamic organization to obtain the skills necessary to protect our great nation. I also plan to give back, by assisting others who are also pursuing a career in National Security. I am truly humbled.”

“Ms. Vadsaria is a smart government contractor, working in multiple organizations, and changing her career focus,” said Mr. James R. Lint, President and CEO of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “This makes her a more valuable employee due to her learning new methods in different agencies, and now new talents for further use in Federal Government support.”

The Lint Center’s Lee and Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship provides $500 to students who display a passion, understanding, and appreciation of international relations, cultural awareness and the impact pioneers for positive change can achieve. In her winning essay, Ms. Vadsaria’s used her experience as a Social Scientist while deployed down-range with the U.S. Army to establish a series of recommendations on how the military can improve the quality of its interpreters.

Due to the generosity and continued support of Stratfor, the world’s leading geopolitical intelligence platform (www.stratfor.com), Naheed Vadsaria will also receive a one-year subscription to Stratfor Worldview which includes industry leading geopolitical analysis, and rigorous forecasting of emerging global developments.

About Stratfor:

As the world’s leading geopolitical analysis platform, Stratfor brings valuable context to global events, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. By leveraging a deep understanding of history, politics and geography in conjunction with our unique methodology, Stratfor delivers informed perspectives on today’s events and develops a more accurate view of the future. Individual subscriptions and enterprise membership are available at Stratfor.com.

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

United Airlines Incident Provides Management Case Studies for Business Schools

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “United Airlines Incident Provides Management Case Studies for Business Schools”, Online Career Tips, 14 Apr. 2017, Web, http://onlinecareertips.com/2017/04/united-airlines-management-case-studies/

By James Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for
 In Cyber Defense and Contributor, In Homeland Security

Last Sunday, security officials dragged paying passenger Dr. David Dao off United Express Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville, Kentucky. As a result of his rough treatment, Dr. Dao was hospitalized. The incident, which passengers filmed on their smartphones, escalated into a public relations scandal for United Airlines.

By Tuesday, United’s stock fell 1.1%. This plunge wiped out $255 million of the airline’s market capitalization.

The market decline amounted to a major pay cut for United’s Chief Executive Officer, Oscar Munoz, based on his stock options and other future payments.

[Related: It’s Time to Improve Passenger Protection Laws for Overbooked Airlines]

United’s Handling of Situation Likely Caused Its Stock Decline

United’s handling of this incident is partially to blame for the stock decline. Munoz failed to promptly acknowledge the injuries Dao suffered and the stress to Dao and his wife caused by this incident.

Munoz also did not offer a sincere apology as a result of this incident at first. Instead, Munoz insisted that the security officers had followed proper United procedures. A few days later, Munoz finally issued a public apology.

In the meantime, Dr. Dao has hired two lawyers to proceed with lawsuits against United.

Solutions to the Practice of ‘Bumping’ on Aircraft

One solution for a company like United would be to offer better incentives. Perhaps the airline could increase the incentive to get off the plane from $1,000 to $2,000. MarketWatch reports “United’s revenues come to about $36 billion a year, or roughly $100 million a day.” Surely, United can afford to sweeten the pot when asking a passenger to take the next flight.

Another suggestion would be not to use law enforcement to remove passengers like Dr. Dao. What charges could officers have pressed? Trespassing would seem like one possibility. But airlines spend a lot of marketing money to fill seats. Telling a passenger that he is going to be removed because he is trespassing seems counterproductive to the goal of filling seats.

Management Lessons to Be Learned from United Airlines’ PR Disaster

While companies never publicly admit to mistakes for fear of lawsuits, Munoz’s initial statement violated a key element of leadership: Leaders take responsibility and fix the problem. Munoz’s numerous contradictory press statements is a case study of what management should not do in a crisis situation or how to make a complete mess of a public relations program. Public relations studies of United’s handling of the affair will go on for years.

Dao’s Treatment Could Also Impact United’s Future Markets in Asia

Dao’s claim that he was targeted for removal because he is Asian could adversely affect United’s business in Asia especially. Many future passengers have probably seen the video of this incident on social media, which could harm any plans United might have for expansion in Asia.

All in all, this was not a proud moment for the United States or for United Airlines.

United Airlines Has Provided an Excellent Management Case Study

As an instructor in the School of Business, I find this incident to be an excellent teaching event for students to discuss and learn from United’s mistakes. As sad as this case is, there are a plethora of lessons to be learned from Dr. Dao’s case, such as how good managers should act and how to properly manage a public relations crisis. These learning experiences are applicable for college freshmen as well as corporate chief executive officers.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 45th scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba, in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” a book published in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea,” and a new book in 2017, Secrets to Getting a Federal Government Job.”

Employees with Poor Grammar Affect Your Company Image

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “Employees with Poor Grammar Affect Your Company Image”, Online Career Tips, 31 Mar. 2017, Web, http://onlinecareertips.com/2017/03/employees-grammar-company-image/

By James Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for
 In Cyber Defense and Contributor, In Homeland Security

I teach a Management 100 class at American Military University called Human Relations. In this class, we talk about some hiring actions and first impressions. In today’s computer-based world, that first impression of a person or company is often online.

Proper grammar shapes that first impression. We would never go to a job interview with our shoes untied. So why would people think poor grammar is not a faux pas, too?

Good Grammar Reveals Company Credibility and Employees’ Learning Capabilities

In my class, I share Kyle Wiens’ Harvard Business Review article, “I Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s Why.”

Wiens is the CEO of iFixit, the world’s largest online repair manual publisher. He is also the founder of Dozuki, which helps companies write their own technical documentation such as paperless work instructions and step-by-step user manuals.

Wiens is a self-described grammar stickler who hires many writers and software code writers. Anyone applying for a job at one of his companies is required to take a grammar test.

“Good grammar is credibility, especially on the Internet. In blog posts, on Facebook, in emails, and on company websites, your words are all you have,” Wiens says. We represent our employers both on and off duty, he explains. When our social media is a grammatical disaster, it also reflects on the company owner who hired you.

Wiens makes an interesting point: If a 20-year-old person applies for a job and does not know how to use proper grammar, that person’s learning curve and capability make him or her a poor candidate for hiring.

Wiens believes everyone should have learned English grammar in 20 years. He will not hire even great programmers who cannot pass the grammar test. From experience, he has found that they will fail on other tasks, even simple tasks like stocking shelves and labeling parts.

A focus on grammar shows a focus on all tasks, he says.

Writing Well Also Makes A Difference in Hiring Success

I published a book this past January on getting a job in the federal government. Like Wiens, I too focused on the need to make a good first impression in an applicant’s resume. Writing well shows your capabilities and your dependability.

Writing is like learning a foreign language. The more you do it, the easier it gets.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 45th scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba, in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” a book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea,and a new book in 2017 Secrets to Getting a Federal Government Job.”