Veteran’s Day 2019 Message

Throughout our nation’s history, brave men and women have always answered the call to protect America and defend our way of life. On Veterans Day, the Lint Center recognizes and wishes to thank all those who have worn the uniform in service to our great nation.

The Lint Center extends its gratitude to all our veteran volunteers and to all of this nation’s veterans for their service, sacrifices, and dedication to safeguarding America.

Captain Maren Culbreth Awarded 2019 Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. Scholarship

The Lint Center for National Security Studies Awards 2019 Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. Scholarship to Captain Maren Culbreth

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., a non-profit organization focused on supporting the next generation of America’s National Security professionals through scholarships and mentoring opportunities, today announced the winner of the 2019 Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. Scholarship.

Captain Maren Culbreth was awarded the Lint Center’s Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr. scholarship for her continued and demonstrated commitment to advancing national security. The scholarship provides $1,000 to recipients pursuing scholastic study in fields related to alliance building, counterintelligence, cultural understanding, and national security studies.

Captain Culbreth’s scholarship essay dealt with a series of challenges she experienced during her time in the US Army and the personal growth she achieved as a result. She was a helicopter pilot who put in the long hours and late nights only to learn halfway through a deployment that the Army was retiring her airframe, the Kiowa Warrior. Undeterred, she transferred to Civil Affairs until an injury cut short her training. Suddenly she had became a pilot without an aircraft to fly or a mission to complete. Seeing her military career coming to an end, she applied and was accepted to law school.

“I’m glad I worked so hard and left it all on the field,” Captain Maren Culbreth says. “If I’d given anything less than my best, this would have been impossible to survive. This scholarship will help me continue to realize my dream from 2007,  for our country and communities in which we live. Being awarded this scholarship will go far in helping me realize the dream I have to continue serving others long into the future. I want to thank the Lint Center for the tremendous support this scholarship provides.”

“Captain Culbreth was in the Army and learned there are good days and bad. The Army does not always do as we desire, but we have been a free country for 243 years. She will learn and do well in the next chapter of her life,” said Mr. James R. Lint, President and CEO of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “Many have been in her footsteps and will follow her steps.”

You can read her essay here.

About the Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr., Scholarship:

The Staff Sgt Richard Eaton Jr. Memorial Scholarship is dedicated in honor of Staff Sgt. Richard Eaton, a United States Army Counterintelligence Special Agent and Bronze Star recipient who died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, on August 12, 2003 (Iraq time). The scholarship fund provides $1,000 to recipients pursuing scholastic study in fields related to Alliance Building, Counterintelligence, Cultural Understanding, and National Security studies.

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit http://www.lintcenter.org/.

This press release was prepared by Lint Center Volunteer, Ben Oatis.

Smoke Grenades Do Not A Target Make

By Anonymous

There were a lot of boring days. For every minute of excitement, there were fifty minutes of mind-numbing boredom. We’d check in with ground forces, sometimes begging for something to do. We took a lot of pictures of potential targets, oddly enough. On the days that no one was getting shot at and there wasn’t much else to do, we threw smoke grenades. The lead aircraft picked the target, which early on was rather large, but over time got smaller and more precise. An airspeed and altitude were chosen, the lead aircraft would go first and trail would follow. Sometimes, we were too close to call.

It wasn’t all fun and games. The smoke-grenade-out-of-the-cockpit-throw was not a technical task we trained as Kiowa pilots. It wasn’t anything I practiced before deploying. Once downrange though, it was clear: accuracy with a smoke grenade could be vitally important. On a particularly heated day supporting a special operations team, my smoke grenade throwing skills came in handy. The guys on the ground and the stack of aircraft above couldn’t agree on a target. I came on the radio, suggesting that our little single engine helicopter could solve the problem. My right seater flew us as fast as we could go, dropped us down over top of this building, and I dropped smoke. Everyone saw the plume billow, agreed it was the right building, and we moved on with more important events of the day.

One of the problems we encountered frequently was as pilots we had a large overlap in the Venn diagram between being a “tactical” and “strategic” asset. Tactically, we were important to anyone in contact with the enemy. Strategically, we carried more weight because our munitions were bigger. We could make bigger mistakes, which always made bigger news.

Sometimes, we were assigned missions purely because of optics. If a very important Afghan official was going somewhere by helicopter, we supported that flight. The threat could be incredibly low, but we went anyway – it just looked better. On election day, we were tasked to fly, but had to be 3,000 feet above the ground. Normally we flew much lower, but no one wanted us in the background of any pictures above polling stations. We had to show the Afghans were in charge of these elections.

One afternoon, we saw something odd. There was a school building we’d seen kids running in and out of before – a building we recognized. However, on that day there were no kids. What we saw instead were a bunch of motorcycles parked outside of the building, and what looked like the Afghan version of rent-a-cops standing outside. This looked, in a word, suspicious. We wanted to get a record of what we saw. We decided to drop a smoke grenade so we could take pictures at a distance, in order to give a good idea of where the building was. This smoke grenade would set off bombs in other areas.

The next morning, my Battalion Commander came by. “We need to talk about the school children you targeted yesterday.” Clearly, this smoke grenade had taken on a life of its own. I explained what actually happened the day before, pulling up the pictures we submitted in our report. He looked everything over and said, “Well, what it looked like to the rest of the world was that you were marking a target, and the target was a school. I know you didn’t shoot anything, I see from your pictures there aren’t any school children around. But let’s just keep the smoke grenades in the cockpit for a while.”

That wouldn’t be the last incident we encountered where optics created a bit of an issue between what was tactically important and what was strategically important. What I learned most in my time slinging smoke grenades about the battlefield is that optics and opinions cannot be discounted when determining the outcome. If we want to better prepare our future leaders in National Security, we must do a better job preparing them to analyze how to use optics and opinions in their favor. We cannot always rely on our public affairs teams to spin the story for us – we have to get better at understanding the story before it happens so we can take steps to win both tactically and strategically. I thought optics were my enemy for a while. I loathed the restrictiveness of them. But in the end, I learned that by creating good optics, by playing within the restrictive bounds of what “looks good,” we could help our brothers on the ground be more successful in their tactical endeavors.

Eventually, the ban on smoke grenades was lifted. We lived to billow another day.

 

Lint Center Announces New CEO and President

New leader to usher in the next phase of growth and mentorship engagement

Dated:  September 20, 2019

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit 501(c)(3) charitable organization created to award merit-based scholarships and to provide mentoring programs, today announced that it has named Timothy W. Coleman as its new Chief Executive Officer and President. The appointment comes as the Lint Center is poised to announce a new round of scholarship winners and as it continues to execute on its core mission to empower, enhance, and enable the next generation of intelligence and security professionals.

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, has awarded 57 scholarships and mentoring opportunities to individuals pursuing careers in intelligence, counterintelligence and national security. More than 200 mentors, seasoned practitioners in their field, volunteer through the Lint Center to show the next generation of leaders what they can do in the U.S. Intelligence Community.

“This is an exciting time for the Lint Center and I am thrilled to take on this new role as CEO and President and lead this very talented team,” said Timothy W. Coleman. “Mr. James R. Lint and Dr. Anna Lint founded, nurtured, and developed an all-volunteer organization with an unmatched mission. With purposeful intent Mr. Lint created the Lint Center because he identified a need for mentoring programs and scholarship initiatives in order to seed a talent development pipeline in support of America’s most promising and emerging leaders.”

“James Lint’s leadership and tutelage were the driving factors creating this impactful organization and his tireless efforts made it a reality of consequence. His passion, dedication, and commitment to national service remain our guidepost and we are honored to continue the work he started,” Coleman further observed.

“Having served as CEO of the Lint Center for more than a decade and with nearly 60 scholarship winners during my tenure, I am pleased to be passing the torch to the next generation who will continue to identify, mold, and mentor future leaders in the intelligence and national security arena,” said James R. Lint, Founder and President Emeritus of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “I am pleased to see that one of our first winners and one of our longest volunteers, Tim, will be assuming the role as CEO. I am supremely confident in his leadership capabilities, having worked side-by-side with him for years, and his dedication to the mission.

“More importantly, I am eternally grateful to the countless volunteers who helped make the Lint Center as successful and impactful as it has been. I look forward to seeing the Lint Center grow and prosper, as its impact will be felt for decades to come.”

Mr. Timothy W. Coleman was one of the first scholarship recipients from the Lint Center for National Security Studies, having been awarded the Aehee Kim Alliance Building Award in 2008. Shortly after his scholarship and an extremely successful Lint Center mentorship, Tim decided it was time to “give back” by volunteering with the Center. Previously, Tim served as Operations Coordinator, Public Information Officer, and worked his way up to Vice President managing day-to-day operations and providing strategic counsel to the Lint Center’s Board of Directors. https://www.lintcenter.org/about-us/leadership-team/

Mr. James R. Lint served in the United States military for over 20 years, in both the U.S. Marine Corps (7 years) and U.S. Army (14 years). He spent four years as a Marine Counterintelligence specialist and nearly 15 years as an Army Counterintelligence Special Agent. Lint has expertise in counterintelligence, cyber security and information assurance, terrorism and counterterrorism, human intelligence collection and prevention, as well as low-intensity asymmetric warfare. He founded the Lint Center for National Security Studies in 2007, and has served as its CEO since inception. He remains Chairman Emeritus of the Lint Center. https://www.lintcenter.org/portfolio-item/james-r-lint/

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization created to award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed IRS-approved charity. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

***

Fourth of July 2019

Happy Independence Day!

Freedom and independence are words affectionately and passionately associated with the United States of America. On the Fourth of July, the U.S.A. celebrates the bountiful freedom we have fought for. However, as we do prepare to celebrate yet another year of freedom, we must keep in mind its fragility. As easily as it was obtained, it can be cruelly stripped away. Therefore, no matter how you choose to celebrate the nation’s birthday, take a moment to pause. Recall just how hard generations before have worked to secure, maintain, and reinforce our freedoms, and how each of us must remain steadfastly determined to propel our ever-changing nation forward and the underpinning principles that make it so profound. After all, it was not just the freedom we know today that was born on July 4th, but also the country we all proudly call home.

Image Source: Commons.Wikipedia.Org

The Lint Center Announces Generous Donation from Geopolitical Futures

Geopolitical Futures and the Lint Center partner to broaden the insight of scholarship winners on relationships between geography, demography, resource scarcity, military capability and other key drivers of the international system.

June 20, 2019

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit organization established to promote and advance the academic and professional preparation of America’s next generation National Security and Counterintelligence workforce, is pleased to announce a generous donation from Geopolitical Futures, a successful global forecasting organization rooted in geopolitical analysis and risk assessment.

Geopolitical Futures will provide Lint Center for National Security Scholarship winners with an annual subscription to its geopolitical service focused on delivering non-partisan, transparent, and objective forecasting.

“We are very excited to receive this gracious contribution from Geopolitical Futures and appreciate their willingness to support and acknowledge the efforts of the Center, as we continuously strive to discover, counsel, and enrich the future National Security workforce of the United States,” said James R. Lint, President and CEO of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “We are extremely delighted to receive this substantial gift from Geopolitical Futures and believe it will enhance the knowledge of the Center’s scholarship recipients by enabling them to access cutting edge analysis on current global topics.”

“We are pleased to recognize and support the mission of the Center in its efforts to identify, mentor, and improve our country’s future workforce,” said George Friedman, Chairman of Geopolitical Futures. “Scholarship recipients will benefit from the fresh perspective provided by our forecasting and analysis professionals, and our insights into political, economic, and military developments occurring around the globe. We look forward to continuing our work with the Center as it strives to empower, enhance, and enable the next generation.”

 

About Geopolitical Futures

Geopolitical Futures is the leading provider of geopolitical analysis and forecasting information. Using GPF’s unique model, our global analysts understand the past and identify the patterns, monitoring the world, connecting the dots, explaining why things matter, and how they impact the relationships between nations. GPF provides guidance to reduce risk for financial, manufacturing, supply-chain and other global industries. We filter the noise, allowing readers and clients to focus on what’s important to move life and business forward – allowing them to see the opportunities as well as risks. Geopolitical Futures, LLC is a for-profit entity, led by George Friedman and based in Austin, Texas.


About Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization created to award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed IRS-approved charity. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

 

Prepared by:  Volunteer Caren McDonald

Memorial Day 2019

“Duty, Honor, Country. Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be.”    – General Douglas MacArthur

Memorial Day is an important day for everyone, in many cases, serving as a day to remember and pay respects to loved ones no longer present. At the same time, it is a time to honor those who have laid down their lives protecting our great country. This day of remembrance centers around those who have given the ultimate sacrifice to defend our ever-growing nation we all know and love. Today, we pay our profound respects to those who have sacrificed in service for the protection of the United States and our fundamental freedoms. It is without question the exceedingly brave and compassionate person who is willing to lay down their own life to protect the lives, freedoms, and prosperity of their fellow citizens. We owe a debt of gratitude to our fallen heroes that we can never repay.

-Saebria M.

Update Andrew Ertl 12/18

UPDATE: December 2018

Andrew Ertl, previous winner of the Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship in 2016, is currently studying at Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government, where he is pursuing a Master of Public Policy. Andrew said of his current program, “What I can say about Oxford, is that the curriculum here is quite a bit more technically difficult than my last master’s program. Still, I really appreciate the wholistic approach the school takes with regard to policy, and its foundations–I’m learning a lot.”

Andrew, being a History major, has expressed his enjoyment in being surrounded by so many old structures in Europe. He says, “It feels like I’m on a vacation while I’m earning a degree.” He has been able to do a bit of traveling so far, having visited Stonehenge and Bath. Soon enough, he plans to visit Scotland, Ireland, and everywhere in between.

In honor of Veteran’s Day last month and directed towards Mr. James R. Lint, Andrew said, “I just want to say, that I am in awe and inspired by veterans like yourself who gave so much more than myself. You all paved the way for someone like me and not a day goes by that I don’t reflect on that.”

Andrew continues to be proud of his association with the Lint Center for National Security Studies and we look forward to watching his continued success.

Lint Center for National Security Studies Grants a Current Intelligence Professional $1500 to Pursue an Advanced Policy Degree

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., a non-profit organization focused on supporting the next generation of America’s National Security professionals through scholarship and mentoring opportunities, today announced the award winner of the 2018 Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship.

This year’s winner, who for security purposes is known as Ms. B, was awarded the 2018 Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship for her commitment to advancing national security. The Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship provides a $1,500 award to recipients pursuing scholastic study infields related to international affairs, counterintelligence, global understanding, and national security studies.

Ms.B’s scholarship essay investigated the threat that open source information poses to US national security. Terrorists and state actors alike are able to mine troves of publicly available data – social media and mobile messaging, but also property ownership, news articles, and professional biographies – and piece together broad and deep profiles of attractive targets, especially counterintelligence workers. As a result, Ms. B argued that the Intelligence Community can best combat the threat internally by enacting universal education on open source technologies, while also strengthening ties between public and private organizations to prevent exploitation by foreign actors.

Ms. B expressed her sincere gratitude for the award. “The generous support of the Lint Center for National Security Studies has enabled me to develop myself through a graduate education and prepare for future leadership roles within the national security community. Through the Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship, I am able to pursue an advanced degree in public policy from a prestigious institution and apply that expertise to real-world issues facing and approaching the national security community.

“As a result of this funding,” she continued, “I am gaining valuable experience with rigorous data analysis and crafting effective public policy recommendations for efforts in counter terrorism and law enforcement. I deeply appreciate the efforts of the Lint Center to support me and many others through the pursuit of education and research in national security studies.”

“Ms. B presented us with a thoughtful analysis on the serious vulnerabilities we face from everyday sources like our phones and social media platforms,”said Mr. James R. Lint, President and CEO of the Lint Center. “National security professionals must be able to identify potential threats from unexpected directions and be able to present realistic options for how to mitigate them. Ms. B showed us that she would be adept at doing both.”

About the Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship:

The Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship program is offered to help further the education and career development of scholars, especially in the areas of International Affairs, Counterintelligence and National Security. Workers in these fields and their children are encouraged to apply with the goal of improving national security and global understanding. Additional information about the program and other scholarships can be found at https://www.lintcenter.org/scholarships/.

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c)(3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

This press release was prepared by Lint Center Volunteer, Ben Oatis.

Amanda Vicinanzo’s Testimonial

Marcus Tullius Cicero said, “The life of the dead is placed in the memory of the living.” This scholarship in my father’s name has done a powerful thing for my family—it has kept my father’s legacy alive, even after his death. Not only does he live on in the minds and hearts of all those who knew and loved him, but now his courageous example as a father, husband, solider, lawyer, and law enforcement officer is known by many. It is a touching reminder that his sacrifice and heart for public service will never be forgotten.”

U.S. Marine Corps Captain Richard Laszok Awarded 2018 McGaughey Family Scholarship

The Lint Center for National Security Studies Awards 2018 McGaughey Family Scholarship to Captain Richard Laszok

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit organization focused on supporting the next generation of America’s National Security professionals through scholarship and mentoring opportunities, today announced the 2018 McGaughey Family Scholarship award winner.

Captain Richard Laszok was awarded the McGaughey Family Scholarship for his commitment to advancing U.S. national security and intelligence. The McGaughey Family Scholarship provides an annual $1,000 award towards education in national security or intelligence studies.

Captain Laszok’s upbringing in a military family instilled in him a sense of patriotism and service. This led to his enrollment in U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, where he studied logistics, intermodal transportation, and navigation. Once on active duty, he served in the Infantry and Reconnaissance communities as a Platoon Commander, Company Executive Officer, and Company Commander, as well as a Team Leader in an Afghan soldier-training center. Captain Laszok is now studying National Security and Statecraft at The Institute of World Politics. He won the Lint Center’s 2018 McGaughey Family Scholarship in part because of his insightful essay on the risks and rewards of trade with China and his essay on the lessons he learned in the Marines about effective advising.

“I am thankful for receiving the McGaughey Family Scholarship to help with my pursuit of obtaining a Master’s degree in Statecraft and National Security. Applying for the scholarship helped me identify an international issue that I want to focus on throughout my graduate studies. I am very excited to have the opportunity to participate in the mentorship program associated with the scholarship. The knowledge and experiences from these talented professionals will help guide me during my transition from the military to the civilian workforce,” says Captain Laszok.

“We’re excited to work with Captain Laszok,” explains James R. Lint, President and CEO of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “His record of service is solid, and we are looking forward to see what he will do when we combine his passion for national service, his foundational education and our subject matter expertise-based mentorship.”

About the McGaughey Family Scholarship:

The McGaughey Family Scholarship seeks to identify and recognize outstanding recipients pursuing scholastic study in fields related to Alliance Building, Counterintelligence, Cultural Understanding, and National Security studies. Workers in these fields and their children are encouraged to apply. Additional information about the program and other scholarships can be found at  https://www.lintcenter.org/scholarships/.

 

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

 

This press release was prepared by Lint Center Volunteer, Sarah White.

China’s Challenge to the U.S.

by Richard Laszok
Published with Permission

Competition between China and the U.S. does not have to result in a win-lose situation, but this requires both countries to renegotiate current trade policies.  The current negotiations can provide a win-win deal for both countries.  Factors that contribute to a nations global power are its economic policies, military strength, and technological development.  The U.S. is currently the hegemon because of its strong economy, superior military, support for innovation, and altruistic approach to foreign relations.  China’s rise as a global power will use these factors to challenge the U.S. domination and become the new global leader (Pillsbury, 2018, pp. 143-144).

As China’s economy strengthens it will have the resources to modernize its military to in efforts to protect its natural resources and sea-lanes.  China has a hybrid economic structure where the government subsides private companies that its government has interest in (Pillsbury, 2018, p. 149).  Such subsidies are used for research and development in the industries in which China sees as opportunistic.  Due to these factors, competition between foreign companies becomes largely one sided.  These companies also conduct economic espionage and steal intellectual property, challenging U.S. and foreign companies (Pillsbury, 2018, p. 189).

In the March 2018 address to China by President Xi, he stated that China was not interested in “seeking hegemony or [would] engage in expansion” (Fong, 2018).  This doesn’t necessarily mean China doesn’t aspire to become the global leader eventually.  As Michael Pillsbury outlines in his book “The Hundred-Year Marathon” China’s leaders would avoid using such rhetoric that might alarm the world of their true intentions (Pillsbury, 2016).  China does not want to be perceived as threatening while they build and grow.  An example of this is the slow build up and militarization of islands in the South China Sea.  China is using this as a way to secure the natural resources within the area such as fishing, oil, and minerals.  It also helps secure the sea-lanes surrounding China and provide a military buffer zone for Mainland China (Pillsbury, 2018, p. 143).

Another concern is how the government subsidies Chinese companies.  This practice makes it nearly impossible for foreign companies to compete in those industries.  One example of this is the information and communication company Huawei.  Huawei is becoming a global leader in this industry, but their relationship with the Chinese government raises security concerns to the U.S. and many European countries (Bey, 2018 June 28).  The fear is that the products and services provided by the company could be used to collect information on their customers (Pillsbury, 2016, p. 173).  What is also of great concern is the development of 5G technology and artificial intelligence (Bey, 2018 June 28).  Both have military applications and could rival the U.S. in the near future.  Therefore, as China continues to rise, “the U.S. will continue to expand investment restrictions on Chinese technology companies wishing to enter the U.S.” (Bey, 2018 June 28).

Despite these challenges and the recent threat of a trade war between the two countries, the use of military force or violence is unlikely as the two countries begin to discuss trade reform.  The countries are using and will continue to use the World Trade Organization (WTO) to settle trade disputes.  The U.S. has already “successfully litigated WTO disputes targeting unfair trade practices and upholding our right to enforce U.S. trade laws” (“President Donald J. Trump is Confronting China’s Trade Policies”, 2018).  Leveraging the WTO will ultimately help ensure both countries achieve fair trade deals and compliance with the organizations’ intellectual property and environmental policies.  If China commits to prevent intellectual property theft and encourage U.S. technology companies to compete in the Chinese market, it would benefit its people by allowing them access to more products.  Finally, the U.S. would benefit by having access to the new market.

 

References

  1. Bey, M. (2018, June 28). Huawei’s Success Puts It in Washington’s Sights. Retrieved July 26, 2018, from https://worldview.stratfor.com/article/huaweis-success-puts-it-washingtons-sights-china-technology
  2. Fong, L. (2018, April 15). What would Chinese hegemony look like? A lot like US Leadership. Retrieved July 26, 2018 from https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/opinion/article/2141661/what-would-chinese-hegemony-look-lot-us-leadership
  3. Pillsbury, M. (2016). The hundred-year marathon: Chinas secret strategy to replace America as the global superpower. New York, NY: Griffin.
  4. President Donald J. Trump is Confronting China’s Unfair Trade Policies. (2018, May 29). Retrieved July 27, 2018, from https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trump-confronting-chinas-unfair-trade-policies/

American University Graduate Student, Jared Zimmerman, Awarded International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship

The Lint Center for National Security Studies Awards 2018 International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship to Jared Zimmerman.

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit dedicated to fostering the educational development of the next generation of America’s Counterintelligence and National Security professionals through scholarship and mentoring opportunities, and the International Association for Intelligence Education (IAFIE), the leading international organization for Intelligence Education, today announced the 2018 International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship award winner.

Mr. Jared Zimmerman was awarded the Lint Center’s IAFIE Scholarship for his commitment to advancing national security and intelligence. The Lint Center’s IAFIE Scholarship provides a $1,500 award towards education in national security or intelligence studies.

Mr. Zimmerman is a first year graduate student at American University’s School of International Service in Washington, D.C. where he is pursuing an MA in International Affairs with a focus on U.S. foreign policy and national security. Prior to enrolling in graduate school, he spent five years working in the software industry. In his scholarship essay, Zimmerman argued that not all terrorists acting alone deserve the “lone wolf” label. Lone wolves, says Zimmerman, are those who act entirely alone and for their own cause. Terrorists that run solo operations in support of or even as part of a larger global jihadist movement should instead be labelled Individual Terrorism Jihadists (ITJ). He then reviewed recent high profile cases of lone wolf attackers, such as the Austin Serial Bomber and the DC Beltway sniper, and parsed the differences.

“I am honored and excited to be this year’s recipient of the International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship through the Lint Center for National Security Studies,” Mr. Zimmerman said. “Many of my peers have dedicated themselves to similar goals, face similar challenges, and have submitted impressive essays, and so I consider it a great honor to receive this year’s IAFIE Scholarship. I am eager to meet with my mentor and discuss my future as I explore ways forward into the Intelligence Community. I also wish to thank the Lint Center for the tremendous support it provides students like myself. The scholarship and mentorship are such valuable resources to young people who want to serve their country.”

“Jared Zimmerman’s scholarship essay further refining motivators of individual terrorists shows the kind of outside the box thinking that is critical to the Intelligence Community,” said Mr. James R. Lint, President and CEO of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “Paired with his background in software development and the guiding hand of one of our mentor, I am confident that Mr. Zimmerman will be a powerful asset to any agency and a quality national security worker.”

About the International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship:

The International Association for Intelligence Education is the leading international organization for Intelligence Education. The Association was formed in June 2004 as a result of a gathering of sixty plus intelligence studies trainers and educators at the Sixth Annual International Colloquium on Intelligence at Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pennsylvania. The mission of the Association is to advance research, knowledge and professional development in intelligence education. For more information, please visit www.iafie.org.

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

 

This press release was prepared by Lint Center Volunteer, Ben Oatis.

Update Julie Slama

UPDATE: October 2018

Julie Slama, winner of the 2016 Lee and Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship, has sent in this update:

I’m currently in my first year of law school at the University of Nebraska, after graduating this spring with a degree in Political Science from Yale University. In the past two years, I’ve had the chance to travel to 31 countries. The LC scholarship program was a big help in ensuring that I had the funds necessary to focus on my studies. Thank you for your continued support.

Update XO Steven McDonald

UPDATE: September 2018

After running a small optical boutique with his wife for several years, Steven McDonald decided that it was time to pursue his dream career, rather than a mere occupation. Realizing that doing so would be no simple task, Steven decided that the best route to his goal involved going back to school. After researching an array of colleges, Steven came across American Public University System, where he enrolled, earning a BA in Intelligence Studies (Cyber) in 2016 with a 3.93 GPA.

Shortly after completing his bachelor’s program, Steven decided to continue his educational pursuits at APUS, and is currently three courses away from earning a master’s degree. Steven recently became a University Ambassador at APUS, and belongs to several honor societies including National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS), Golden Key, Order of Sword and Shield, Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Phi Sigma, and Phi Alpha Delta’s Society of Scholars.

Originally from Illinois, Steven and his family relocated to the Flint Hills area of Kansas several years ago, and just recently made the decision to move to Topeka, KS. Steven loves giving back, and for the past year he has spent time volunteering for both the NSCS and the Lint Center for National Security Studies as a scholarship reviewer. In his free time Steven enjoys reading, logic puzzles, lifting weights, painting, traveling, and spending time with his family. Steven’s wife and eldest daughter (Saebria) are also students at APUS, with his wife currently pursuing a master’s degree, and his daughter pursuing a bachelor’s degree.