From the Scholarship Committee

Scholarship Application Instructions

Scholarship Descriptions

Click to Apply


Key Benefits

  • Help smart innovative scholars to attend college and contribute to National Security, Freedom and build better alliances
  • Create a forum for idea generation to aid national security
  • Assist scholars in getting published
  • Give back to society and National Security
  • Mentor and help those that may help the nation and freedom in the future

Capability 1
This program is offered to help further the education and career development of scholars, especially in the areas of International Affairs, Counterintelligence and National Security.  Workers in these fields and their children are  encouraged to apply with the goal of improving national security and global understanding.

Capability 2
Based upon availability, a minimum of one scholarship will be awarded per year. The amount and number of the scholarships will be determined by the amount of donated money that is available each year. Scholarship funds are intended for the cost of tuition and fees for classes only. Room and Board will not be funded. Candidates who do not win their scholarship of choice will also be eligible for the other available scholarships.

Capability 3
Publish scholar’s papers on National Security at Lint Center for National Security Studies. In addition to the monetary award, a National Security Professional  is available to mentor the award winner, if requested.

From the Scholarship Committee


By completing this scholarship application, you become a candidate for all of the scholarships listed below. Candidates are first evaluated for the Jim & Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship. Those who do not win this scholarship will still be eligible for all other scholarships.

Based upon availability, a minimum of one scholarship will be awarded per year. The amount and number of the scholarships will be determined by the amount of donated money that is available each year. Scholarship funds are intended for the cost of tuition and fees for classes only. Room and Board will not be funded. Applications received after the deadline will be considered for the following year. All information provided on your scholarship application will be treated with the utmost confidentiality.

Scholarship winners will receive the opportunity to have a mentor from the Counterintelligence or National Security profession sponsored by The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc. In addition, Stratfor has generously donated a free subscription for the winner.

We want to greatly thank you for your interest, and all who support The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc, Scholarship Program through their generous donations. The Lint Center expects to receive applications from many exceptional students. Unfortunately, we can only select a very limited number to receive the scholarship. We wish each and every applicant a most prosperous future.

As The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc continues to grow, and as others continue to become aware and appreciate the efforts of The Lint Center Scholarship Program, we hope to be able to expand our endeavors and award more scholarships to such deserving scholars.

We hope to assist our students to achieve their educational goals and aspire to leadership in the pursuit of freedom and a better world.

Best wishes to all our student/scholars,

The Lint Center For National Security Studies Scholarship Committee


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Scholarship Application Instructions

Please read all instructions before completing the application form. Incomplete applications will be withdrawn from consideration.

CAPSTONE Essay:
Prepare an 600-800 word essay fully explaining one of the goals or concepts of The Lint Center for National Security Studies. This can be your thoughts, feelings, ideas or experiences pertaining to Counterintelligence, National Security, Alliance Building, and/or National Defense.

Ground-breaking innovative ideas/solutions are desired. Essays will be judged on scholarly rigor, creativity and innovation. Authors are encouraged to be interdisciplinary in their thinking. The author of the essay will be judged by former Counterintelligence Special Agents. See our new Essay Idea Page for examples and inspiration.

Scholarship winners will receive the opportunity to have a mentor from the Counterintelligence or National Security profession sponsored by The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc. Due to the generosity of Stratfor, they have donated a free subscription for the winner.

We want to greatly thank you for your interest, and to all who support The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc, Scholarship Program through their generous donations. The Lint Center expects to receive applications from many exceptional students. Unfortunately we can only select a very limited number to receive the scholarship. We wish each and every applicant a most prosperous future.

As The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc continues to grow, and as others continue to become aware and appreciate the efforts of The Lint Center Scholarship Program, we hope we will be able to expand our endeavors and award more scholarships to such deserving scholars.

We hope to assist our students to achieve their educational goals and aspire to leadership in the pursuit of freedom and a better world.

All accompanying essays must have the statement:

“I (request/do not request) this Essay to be published on the Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc website (with/without) my name published.” Pick your choices.

A goal of the Lint Center will be to increase the publishing of papers related to the National Security goals and scholarship essays will allow ideas to improve and sometimes the first published work for our young scholars.

Click to Apply


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Scholarship Descriptions

The Ira Dale Smith, Chief Petty Officer, U.S. Navy (Ret.) Scholarship ($500)

Ira Dale Smith was a retired Navy Chief Petty Officer (E-7) and a veteran of three wars. He was a native of McMinnville, Oregon, and a San Diego County resident for 28 years. He proudly served in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. He began his military service when he enlisted in the U.S. Navy as a seaman apprentice and eventually worked his way up to Chief Petty Officer. When his service with the U.S. Navy ended, he then proceeded to serve in both the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Coast Guard. After he successfully completed his enlistments, he then served his community as a law enforcement officer (Trooper) with the Oregon State Police.

Ira Dale Smith’s medals include: W 1 Victory (3 stars), American Defense (1 star), Asiatic Pacific (11 stars), PUC (1 star), Navy Occupation Service, WW 2 Victory, Korean Service (2 stars), and U.N. Ribbon. His last duty station was US NAAS Ream Field, where he retired on April 01, 1960.

Ira Dale Smith was the national president of the Two Timer Veterans Association and a life member/past president of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9512. He was also a life member of Ladies Auxiliary VFW National Home, past president of the Southwestern Regional Fleet Reserve Association, and a member of Amvet Post 5.

Ira Dale Smith died on Friday, March 26, 1976 in San Diego, California. He left behind a wife, a daughter, three grandchildren, and an everlasting legacy that demonstrates the importance of serving one’s country.

“I am incredibly thankful and forever grateful to the Lint Center for honoring my great-grandfather, Ira Dale Smith, with a scholarship in his name. This scholarship exemplifies what it means to live a life of duty, honor, and country. Although I was never able to actually meet him, I have heard many stories of his brave service to this country as not only as a service member but also as a law enforcement officer. His selflessness and dedication to America constantly inspires me, and it is my hope that this scholarship will inspire others to live a life that is bold and purposeful.” – Amber N.K. Antony

Patrick M. Hughes, Lieutenant General, U.S. Army, Retired Inspiration Scholarship ($500)

patrickmhughesPatrick M. Hughes (born September 19, 1942) is a retired United States Army officer who served the 12th Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. He joined the United States Department of Homeland Security in 2003 as the Assistant Secretary for Information Analysis (Intelligence), and departed from DHS and Government service in March 2005.

General Hughes faced critical challenges in the area of terrorism in his first year as Director. In the wake of a terrorist bombing of US barracks at Khobar Towers on 25 June 1996 that left 24 dead and 500 wounded, DIA re-examined its counter-terrorism capability. Former DIA Director, Lieutenant General James Clapper, USAF (Ret), was selected as participant on the Khobar Towers Bomb Blast Assessment Team.

In March 1996, General Hughes produced the first of his “Purple Books” A Primer on the Future Threat, 1996-2010, which were extremely well received by policymakers, the Intelligence Community, and the warfighter. A product he conceived while he was the J-2, it provided DIA’s perspective of the future threat and was designed to stimulated discussion on the challenges facing US interests. It was published in three additional editions in 1997, 1998, and 1999. Press Release.

Background information and some of his publications.

Additional story about how In American Military You Can Grow – PVT to LT General Hughes

International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship ($1,500)


This scholarship is for Intelligence professionals and personnel desiring to make a career in the Intelligence field. Your essay should describe your affiliation with the Intelligence career field or how you are working towards that goal. The winner, as with all of our winners, will receive a mentor in the Intelligence career field. More information HERE!

Jim & Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship ($1,500)

This program is offered to help further the education and career development of scholars, especially in the areas of International Affairs, Counterintelligence and National Security. Workers in these fields and their children are encouraged to apply with the goal of improving national security and global understanding.

This program is offered to help further the education and career development of scholars, especially in the areas of International Affairs, Counterintelligence and National Security. Workers in these fields and their children are encouraged to apply with the goal of improving national security and global understanding.

Based upon availability, a minimum of one scholarship will be awarded per year. The amount and number of the scholarships will be determined by the amount of donated money that is available each year. Scholarship funds are intended for the cost of tuition and fees for classes only. Room and Board will not be funded. Candidates who do not win the Jim and Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship will be eligible for other scholarships such as the Virginia & Frank Misselhorn Memorial Scholarship. PDF scanned submission closure date: 31 July.

Applications received after the July 31st deadline will be considered for the following year. All information provided on your scholarship application will be treated with the utmost confidentiality.


Press Release

Lee and Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship ($500)


The Eekwon Lee and Jongja Byun Scholarship seeks to identify and recognize the most outstanding applicant who displays a passion, understanding, and appreciation of international relations, cultural awareness, and the impact pioneers for positive change can achieve. (First awarded in 2009)

The creation of the Eekwon Lee and Jongja Byun International Relations and Cultural Awareness Scholarship is part of the Center’s unveiling of the Pioneer Fund for Unfettered Freedom, Excellence, and Entrepreneurship. The newly established Pioneer’s Fund recognizes the contribution of individuals who demonstrate an unwavering commitment to freedom, a devotion to excellence, and an unbridled enthusiasm for entrepreneurship.

This scholarship will award $500 to the winning applicant to assist with tuition and other educational costs. The scholarship is open to both U.S. citizens and citizens of countries around the world. The deadline for scholarship consideration is January 31 each year. Each year will be a new scholarship competition.

Lee and Byun, the former a South Korean native noncombatant and the later, born in North Korea, woman who would become a refugee and internally displaced person during the Korean War (ca. 1950). Prior to being evacuated from the Chosen Reservoir to Pusan, Korea by U.S. military personnel, Byun’s father, a civilian, was summarily executed by Communists forces. Byun’s mother was able to ensure that two of her four daughters were evacuated to safety. In the end, Byun’s mother and two other sisters were forced to remain in Communist controlled North Korea. They have not been heard from since.

The children of Eekwon Lee and Jongja Byun are the legacy of selfless sacrifice and the success of those who seize the opportunity of freedom – two are Ph.D professors, one in Korea and one in USA; and two are administrators.

For more information, see the essay and writings of Yoon-Mee Lee, granddaughter of Eekwon Lee and Jongja Byun.

Press Release

Army Staff Sgt. Richard S. Eaton Jr., Scholarship ($1,000)


The scholarship is dedicated in honor of Staff Sgt. Richard Eaton, a United States Army Counterintelligence Special Agent and Bronze Star recipient who died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, on August 12, 2003 (Iraq time).

eaton-richard
Staff Sgt. Richard Eaton was awarded the Bronze Star for his service during Operation Iraqi Freedom. In addition to numerous other medals and citations, Staff Sgt Eaton received the Thomas Knowlton Award from the Military Intelligence Corps Association which recognizes those individuals who have significantly contributed to the promotion of Army Intelligence. For more information about Staff Sgt. Rick Eaton, please visit:
Press Release

Virginia and Frank Misselhorn Memorial Scholarship ($500)


The Virginia and Frank Misselhorn Memorial Scholarship fund provides $500 to recipients pursuing scholastic study in fields related to Alliance Building, Counterintelligence, and National Security studies. This scholarship is competed for each year in July.

The Virginia and Frank Misselhorn Memorial Scholarship aims to identify, support, and mentor an emerging leader focused on Alliance Building, Counterintelligence, and National Security studies. This scholarship fund provides $500 to recipients pursuing scholastic study in fields related to Alliance Building, Counterintelligence, and National Security studies.

Press Release

Maj. James W. Dennehy Esq. Scholarship ($500)


DennehyPictureThis $500 scholarship is started in memory of a great patriot, and multi-talented American.

Maj. James W. Dennehy, Esquire, age 47, died Wednesday, August 24, 2011, from natural causes. He was on active duty while attending advanced military legal education at the Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center in Charlottesville, Va.

Maj. Dennehy first entered service for his country in 1992 with the United States Coast Guard. He then served as a Milford police officer while completing his degree in Criminal Justice from St. Anselm’s College. Following the September 11, 2001, attack on America, he was commissioned as an officer in the United States Army Reserves.

After graduating from New England School of Law with distinction, he served as a an assistant United States attorney with the United States Attorney’s Office in Concord, and thereafter as a select member of the Department of Homeland Security in the state of New York. Maj. Dennehy returned to his native New Hampshire and opened a private practice law firm serving Nashua, Manchester and Concord.

In 2009, Maj. Dennehy joined the New Hampshire Army National Guard as a JAG officer. Then in 2010, he deployed with New Hampshire’s 197th Fires Brigade in support of Operation New Dawn. Maj. Dennehy held the position of Brigade Judge Advocate General. He served as chief legal advisor for the brigade, consisting of more than 2,600 soldiers who supported a theater security forces mission throughout Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan. Unfortunately, Maj. Dennehy suffered deep vein thrombosis leading to his death, which was likely caused by his flight home from Kuwait.

Maj. Dennehy’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal with M Device, and the Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal.

He is survived by his loving wife of 24 years, Lisa Dennehy, Esquire; twelve children, Amanda J. Vicinanzo and her husband Joseph Vicinanzo, Spc. Mathew J., Hannah D., Tierney R., Mary T., Colleen G., Katherine M., Michael M., Joseph F., Brighid C., Abigail A., and Madeleine C. Dennehy; his father, Donald J. Dennehy; his mother, Jacquelyn VanGelder; one sister, Joan Gowell and her husband Lawrence; two brothers, John W. Dennehy, Esquire and his wife Melinda, and Donald H. Dennehy.

MAJ James W. Dennehy Esq. (1964 – 2011)

John Joseph McGurk III Memorial Scholarship ($500)


The John Joseph McGurk III Memorial Scholarship is dedicated in memoriam to honor a loving father, a dedicated husband and a great friend. Mr. McGurk’s legacy is one of faith, compassion, love and service to his fellow man.

Mr. McGurk served in the United States Army and was called-up for deployment during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis.

A great American in his own right, an avid reader of American history, biographies on great leaders and perspectives on the pivotal role the entrepreneurial spirit played in making this country an outlier for greatness in modern times; McGurk’s passion for knowledge and zest for life continues to serve as a testament to the countless people he counseled and inspired during his lifetime.

This scholarship was created to identify future leaders of consequence who can carry on that which Mr. McGurk knew to be the promise of America.

Mr. Jack McCoy Scholarship ($500)

Mr. McCoy was in the US Navy in Korea during the Korean War. He also has many years of being a great representative of America to foreign college students in Oklahoma City, OK. He has been so helpful and setting the example of what is great about America for many years. This scholarship was set up as a small thank you for his outstanding service to his country and fellow mankind. We also thank the donor for this scholarship in Mr. McCoy’s name. The donor has used this to express her appreciation for Mr. McCoy’s wonderful support many years ago.

To honor this great American write an essay with the topic of personal diplomacy, outside of normal diplomatic channels. This can be focused on personal diplomacy successes that can show the impact of one person/group to change the opinion of others around the world. This could also be focused on changes in diplomatic approaches to solve world problems.

BIOGRAPHY

I was born of parents of Scotch/Irish and English decent in Cleburne, Texas, Johnson County on May 18, 1929. This was the year of the Great Depression. Adversity and hard times during my formative years built in me strength and determination that I could provide for myself. Favorable work ethics leads me to Cleburne High Schools DECA program – Distributive Education Clubs of America where I worked at a men’s store, Singer Sewing Center and for Sears – Sears Roebuck and Company.

After graduation in 1948 I enlisted for three years in the U. S. Navy to see the world in what I thought was the “peace time” Navy. My enlistment was extended to four years while serving aboard an Ocean Fleet Tug during the Korean War.

Early Navy travels opened my world up to many ports and islands in the Pacific – Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Guam, Saipan, Kwajalein, Yap, Wake, Midway, Eniwetok, Johnston Island, and Panama in the Canal Zone.

With the outbreak of the Korean War we left the waters of the Pacific for the Yellow Sea (West Sea) and the East Sea (Sea of Japan.) that surrounds the Korean Peninsular. I was given the opportunity to visit foreign ports and cultures of the Far East: Incheon, Pusan (Busan), Yang Yang, Sok-cho in South Korea and in North Korea the ports of Wonson and Hungnam (Hamhung), also the Japanese ports of Yokosuka, Yokohama, Nagasaki, Sasebo and Tokyo.

After my honorable discharge in 1952 a quest for knowledge and a profession led me to attain a BS degree in Secondary Education from Texas Christian University, Ft. Worth, Texas. While there I studied Far East and European History as well.

Marriage to my wife, Marjorie Ann Dover from Oklahoma, teaching and various endeavors over the years provided me with a business career, farming, and oil and gas lease production. We had only the one daughter, Denise Ann (deceased). She had one daughter, Donna who has three boys: Jarrett, Chandler and Caleb – my great grandsons.

My wife and I returned to Korea in 1983 on a Revisit Program sponsored by the Korean Government for Korean War Veterans. I suppose me and the service men from the different branches of service experienced what is today called “closure”, a very emotional occasion.

My many and frequent trips to Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, China, Guatemala as well as Hawaii and the Caribbean has brought me in touch with the international community. Northwest Baptist Church and All Nations Church – Korean Connection Church, the Vietnam Community Church and the huge number of Oklahoma City University TESOL students (Teaching English as a Second Language) has allowed me to make lasting and meaningful friendships with peoples from many nations..

The world is at our doorstep, yet the majority of foreign students who come to our shores never enter an American home. World peace is at our doorstep if we demand it from our leaders. We must expend the energy to understand one another, make the commitment to communicate through travel, the internet, satellite communication, exchange programs, Friendship Family Programs, and programs that embrace our international brothers and sisters in brotherly love.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow kindness and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad wholesome, charitable view of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” MARK TWAIN, Innocents Abroad.

We are to be an instrument of peace, and take care of our planet and have concern for each other – not be part of the problem, but part of the world’s solution, so all can live in peace and harmony – a world of people, by the people, and for the people with liberty and justice for all.

The terrorist of today could be our friends of tomorrow if we use the greatest weapon of all time, love – loving our neighbor as our self, acceptance and appreciation of differences, a strong desire for justice, and an effort to understand with enduring patience – coupled with kindness, politeness, civility, generosity and true concern for —“every tribe and language and people and nation.” Revelations 5:9NIV.


Billy Jack Mc Coy
November 30, 2008

The Ben Franklin Scholarship at Lint Center ($500)

Benjamin Franklin (17 January 1706 – 17 April 1790) was an American inventor, journalist, printer, diplomat, and statesman.

The Lint Center is pleased to inform you of a recent donation which will sponsor two new scholarships (one in July 2009 and one in January 2010). This generous supporter has requested that the Lint Center determine what these two scholarships should be named and has asked that they honor a legacy of an inspiring individual. The first scholarship will be named after Ben Franklin who was a thinker and success on many fronts from business to diplomacy.

As per the donors request, the primary focus of these scholarships will be on America’s use of “soft-power” and the tangible benefits of cultural awareness in international affairs. Some of the key themes of interest include human security (Economic security, Food security, Health security, and Environmental security), conflict resolution, and personal diplomacy. The focus here is on alternative uses, strategies, and tactics to ensure America’s security, at home and abroad.

Ben Franklin was a dedicated leader who may not have been a warrior but showed how soft power can help a small nation survive.

Lint Center’s ‘Quest for Knowledge’ Scholarship: Christopher J. Coffland ($500)


The Lint Center is pleased to announce the dedication of its ‘Quest for Knowledge’ scholarship to honor United States Army, Corporal Christopher J. Coffland. CPL Coffland was assigned to the 323rd Military Intelligence Battalion and was killed in action during Operation Enduring Freedom in Wardak Province, Afghanistan on November 13, 2009. A dedicated, brave and courageous American, CPL Coffland received two Bronze Stars for bravery and a Purple Heart among other medals for his service.

(Choose one of the following):

Topic: Intelligence Analysis (recommended)

Optimal intelligence analysis requires that analysts understand, appreciate and value numerous factors of significant consequence.  One of these vital elements is having a proper understanding of an opposing forces culture, history, and society.  In other words, a good analyst must know the key differentiating factors from his or her own native culture.

Cultural relativism is a common pitfall and a serious impediment to enhancing America’s intelligence analysis.  To thwart this weakness cultural understanding and increased cultural awareness by analysts is vital to the longevity and success of intelligence assessment and collection. The ability to collect, analyze and conduct intelligence operations (including counterintelligence) have been hindered many times by a lack of understanding the enemy/target culture.

Please consider writing an essay addressing some or all the points listed below:

                        • How can American intelligence stay ahead of opposition forces with increased cultural understanding?
                        • How can America better understand, anticipate, and counter opposing forces commander’s decision making cycle?
                        • Ultimately, what would allow American commanders to disrupt the enemy decision cycle?  Remember, American intelligence organizations cannot unilaterally increase operating budget and must find cost-effective, budget neutral solutions to improve capability (Congress controls the purse strings).

Topic: General Essay (alternate)

Please consider writing an essay on a specific issue of consequence and particular interest which addresses a pertinent topic directly related to national security, strategic studies, cultural awareness, and or diplomacy.

The Lint Center would like to thank the kind donor for making this scholarship possible and selecting the above topics.

Ms. Aehee Kim Alliance Building Scholarship ($500)


Initial scholarship criteria will be similar to the Jim & Anna Hyonjoo Lint Scholarship, with additional two questions that may be used in essay with extra credit:

                        1. How can America improve Alliances with foreign allies?
                        1. What have you done to improve US Alliances

This scholarship will be $500 for tuition and books. Additionally, the essays will be published, and the winner will have a National Security Professional designated as a mentor for one year.

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