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Kessler Awarded International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship

Georgetown University Graduate Student Awarded Intelligence Education Scholarship

The Lint Center for National Security Studies Awards 2017 International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship to Sam Kessler

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit dedicated to fostering the educational development of the next generation of America’s Counterintelligence and National Security professionals, and the International Association for Intelligence Education (IAFIE), the leading international organization for Intelligence Education, today announced the Winter 2017 International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship award winner.

Sam Kessler, an analyst at the U.S. Department of the Treasury and graduate student at Georgetown University, was awarded the International Association for Intelligence Education (IAFIE) Scholarship for his commitment to advancing national security and intelligence. The International Association for Intelligence Education (IAFIE) Scholarship provides a $1,500 award. Kessler was selected based on his embodiment of the principles forwarded by the Lint Center and IAFIE. Kessler is a hard-working emerging leader in the national security arena who has passion, intangible capability, and a desire to serve.

Sam Kessler is currently an analyst at the U.S. Department of the Treasury. He has previously worked for the Congressional Commission on WMD Proliferation & Terrorism and as a contractor at the Department of State and Department of Defense. While at DOD, he completed rotations at the Joint Staff and in Afghanistan with the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) where he served as Assistant Editor of the ISAF Commander’s daily intelligence publication. Sam graduated from the Barrett Honors College at Arizona State University in 2007 with a B.S. in Justice and Social Inquiry and a B.S. in Political Science and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Security Studies from Georgetown University.

“I am sincerely grateful to the Lint Center for their work advancing the education and career development of scholars in international affairs, counterintelligence, and national security and am honored to accept the International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship,” said Kessler. “I look forward to furthering my educational development and joining the growing list of students and professionals who have benefited from the Lint Center’s work to empower individuals and enhance the study of national security issues. I am committed to honoring the core values of service, scholarship, and stewardship while advancing my career as a public servant.”

“Throughout my nearly 40-year career in intelligence and counterintelligence I have seen the need for out-of-the-box thinkers like Sam Kessler,” said Mr. James R. Lint, President and CEO of the Lint Center for National Security Studies. “Kessler’s background and global studies portfolio make him a tremendous asset for the national security and intelligence community. I look forward to watching Sam Kessler’s career and seeing the great contributions via research and development, intelligence sensors and devices, and more.”

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization that provides merit-based scholarships and offers mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

About the International Association for Intelligence Education:

The International Associated for Intelligence Education is the leading international organization for Intelligence Education. The Association was formed in June 2004 as a result of a gathering of sixty plus intelligence studies trainers and educators at the Sixth Annual International Colloquium on Intelligence at Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pennsylvania. The mission of the Association is to advance research, knowledge and professional development in intelligence education. For more information, please visit www.iafie.org.

 

This press release was prepared by Lint Center Volunteer, Linda Yonemoto.

Lint Center and IAFIE Award $1000 Scholarship to Aspiring Intelligence Professional

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, a non-profit dedicated to fostering the educational development of the next generation of America’s Counterintelligence and National Security professionals, and the International Association for Intelligence Education (IAFIE), the leading international organization for Intelligence Education, today announced the Summer 2016 International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship award winner.

The winner, who for security purposes is known only as “WGBIII,” has been awarded a $1,000 scholarship to continue his pursuit of a career in intelligence and national Security. WGBIII was awarded the scholarship based on his embodiment of the principles forwarded by the Lint Center and IAFIE.

“IAFIE is delighted to announce the winner of the Summer 2016 International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship,” said Dr. Larry Valero, President of IAFIE. “WGBIII exemplifies the type of promising individuals we aim to assist through our scholarship initiatives—passion, desire to serve, strong moral fiber and dedication to improving national security.”

WGBIII is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Criminal Justice at Angelo State University (ASU). He holds a Master of Securities Studies, Intelligence and Analysis from ASU and a Bachelor of Business Administration from Thomas Edison State College. He plans to pursue a PhD and teach Security Studies and Intelligence at the conclusion of his intelligence career.

WGBIII has interned with the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, the Federal Law Enforcement Center and Georgetown University Law Criminal Justice Center. He also participated in the U.S. Naval Cadet Corps program where he developed a deep appreciation for American founding principles and military history.

“I am very grateful to both IAFIE and the Lint Center for the scholarship,” WGBIII said. “As a young professional, it means so much to be honored with this award. The scholarship will help defray the financial costs of my educational pathway and I am excited to have the privilege of learning from seasoned veterans in the field through the mentorship program.”

The Summer 2016 International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship was established by the Lint Center to assist talented individuals desiring to make a career in the intelligence field. The scholarship forwards the Lint Center’s shared mission with IAFIE of empowering and supporting emerging national security leaders.

“WGBIII is the first individual to receive the International Association for Intelligence Education Scholarship,” said James R. Lint, CEO at the Lint Center. “The Lint Center and IAFIE have been at the forefront of supporting vitally important careers in intelligence through education and scholarship opportunities. WGBIII clearly demonstrates the core qualities essential in the next generation of emerging leaders which the Lint Center aims to empower through this scholarship.”

About the Lint Center:

The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc., founded in 2007, is a non-profit IRS 501 (c) (3) organization awards award merit-based scholarships and mentoring programs for students pursuing careers in national service with a particular focus on counterintelligence, military intelligence, national security and cross-cultural studies. The Center is Veteran and minority operated and managed. It awards scholarships semi-annually in both January and July. For more information, please visit https://www.lintcenter.org/.

About the International Association for Intelligence Education:

The International Associated for Intelligence Education is the leading international organization for Intelligence Education. The Association was formed in June 2004 as a result of a gathering of sixty plus intelligence studies trainers and educators at the Sixth Annual International Colloquium on Intelligence at Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pennsylvania. The mission of the Association is to advance research, knowledge and professional development in intelligence education. For more information, please visit www.iafie.org.

Lint Center Lands Cover Article for Homeland Security Today Magazine

Screen_shot_2012-10-22_at_3.13.40_PMThe Lint Center’s Public Affairs team had the cover article in this month’s edition of Homeland Security Today Magazine. The article discusses the proliferation of UAVs and the potential double edge sword of Drones.  The cover story article is entitled “When Drones Go Rogue.”

Below is a sampling of some of the article:

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles are providing new capabilities for homeland security and law enforcement. But as with any technology, there’s a dark side too.

he aircraft were just harmless models, if large ones—until one dove into the Pentagon and exploded while the other homed in on the US Capitol, blasting the dome that had been spared on Sept. 11, 2001.

That, at any rate, was the hope of Rezwan Ferdaus, a 26-year-old resident of Ashland, Mass. While American-born and raised, this son of Bangladeshi parents and physics graduate of Northeastern University in Boston, planned to make jihad on the United States and “enemies of Allah,” in his own words. The Pentagon was “the head and heart of the snake” in his view and he wanted to strike with 7-foot long model airplanes as well as with guns and grenades on the ground.

To set his plot in motion, Ferhaus contacted fellow jihadists from Al Qaeda, who supplied him with explosives. In turn, he supplied them with a dozen mobile phone detonators to set off bombs in the Middle East.

To read the full article at Homeland Security Today, please visit HERE.

Homeland Security: Google Launches Public Alerts

Earlier this week, Google’s Crisis Response Project–an initiative to make critical information more accessible around natural disasters and humanitarian crises[i]–unveiled a new project called Google Public Alerts.

Following the release of the new project (via an official blog post from Google) on Wednesday, January 25th, PCMag reports that the Alerts are to provide “timely information about threatening weather conditions through Google Maps.”[ii]

As one probes into this new Google effort, self-reported to “surface emergency information through the online tools you use everyday,”[iii] it is interesting to highlight that Google isn’t actually creating its own data points for these emergencies. Rather, the company is drawing from government-provided data for the Public Alerts project, specifically: the US Geological SurveyNational Weather Service, and US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The availability of government-provided data for the Alerts project leads one to question what other types of mapping and incident data sources are provided by the US government and accessible free of charge to citizens?

A quick search revealed several interesting and worthwhile sources of data. In particular, the US Agency for International Development maintains a Famine Early Warning System (FEWS) Network. The site contains a near and midterm outlook, as well as satellite imagery and weather hazard information for mapping data. Comprehensive as it may seem, some of the globe is still not available, including North Korea. It does, however, provide an interesting overview and service.

Additionally, the US Department of Agriculture’s Forestry Service maintains an Active Fire Mapping Program based on geographic data provided by the National Interagency Coordination Center. While only updated weekly, it provides near real-time fire locations across the US.

Further, the GlobalIncidentMap, a private sector entity, provides various information-rich data points on terrorism incidents, as well as other subjects, like HAZMAT, Disease, Gang, and Drug Interdiction. It is interesting to note that GIM leverages Google Maps as part of its visualization component.

So, what other information and data rich entities are out there? What does it mean that so many extra-government organizations use US government data to support their services?


About the Authors:

Brittany Minder received her BA in International Relations from Stanford University and she serves as the Lint Center’s Public & External Affairs Associate.

Tim Coleman serves as the Center’s Director of Communications.

*Disclaimer: The opinions expressed by the Lint Center Bloggers and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of the Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc. or any employee thereof. The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc. is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the Lint Center Bloggers.


References:

1.     Google Crisis Response Project, 2012, http://www.google.org/crisisresponse/

2.     Official Google Blog, “Public Alerts now on Google Maps,” January 25, 2012, Retrieved on January 31, 2012, http://blog.google.org/2012/01/public-alerts-now-on-google-maps.html.

3.     Horn, Leslie. “Google Public Alerts to Provide Severe Weather Warnings”, PC Mag, January 25, 2012, Retrieved from http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2399354,00.asp

4.     National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2012, http://www.noaa.gov/

5.     The National Weather Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2012, http://weather.gov/

6.     United States Geological Survey, 2012, http://www.usgs.gov/

7.     Central Intelligence Agency, World Factbook: North Korea, January 10, 2012, Retrieved from: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/kn.html

8.     GlobalIncidentMap, 2012, http://www.globalincidentmap.com/


[i] “Google Crisis Response: Frequently Asked Questions”. Google. Retrieved January, 31, 2012, http://www.google.com/crisisresponse/faq.html

[ii] Horn, Leslie. “Google Public Alerts to Provide Severe Weather Warnings”, PC Mag, January 25, 2012, Retrieved from http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2399354,00.asp

[iii] Official Google Blog, “Public Alerts now on Google Maps,” January 25, 2012, Retrieved on January 31, 2012. http://blog.google.org/2012/01/public-alerts-now-on-google-maps.html.

Contributed Post: Homeland Security & Tornado Preparedness

In 1974, I was stationed at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.  On April 3, 1974 I experienced a tornado first hand. That night we lost three Cobra helicopters, I saw what can happen after experiencing such an awesome display of tornado damage and believe everyone should be prepared in the event of severe weather in their area.

Following the recent tornado outbreaks, which have devastated Alabama, Tuscaloosa specifically, and impacted neighboring states alike, I came across a great article written by Pete Spotts of the Christian Science Monitor and felt that the guidance and information were important to share with any and all individuals.

Preparation, preparedness, and knowledge can save your life. The information below is a solid reference point and the reason I felt it was important reiterate.

Regards,
Gary S., Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc.
Mentor

Associated Press Video of the Massive Tornado in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Know where to go, what to bring, and who to tell

Before a storm, make sure you have a place to seek shelter, either in your home or — especially if you live in a mobile home — a strong shelter nearby you can move to if a tornado warning is issued.  Each person should have a “go kit” ready to grab on the way to shelter.  The go kit should include a first-aid kit, flashlight and batteries, identification, matches, copies of important financial documents, an extra set of clothes and other items.  Have a relative outside your community serve as an emergency contact so if family members are caught by the storm in different locations, they can call their status in to that relative.  Emergency managers say it’s often easier to get a call out to a distant community in a disaster than it is to call someone within the same community.

Listen for NOAA tornado watches and warnings

Before a storm, make sure you know the various ways your community receives tornado watches and warnings and make sure you have access to them.  A watch is issued when conditions favorable to tornadoes are imminent or present.  A warning is issued when the local forecast office sees the signature of a tornado on its radar or storm spotters report a funnel cloud or its precursor.  NOAA weather radios are particularly useful if you’re indoors or if a storm system arrives overnight, when you’re sleeping.  The radios’ warning tones are loud and annoying for a reason.

What county do you live in?

Before a storm, be sure you know where in your county you are located, learn the names of the surrounding counties and key geographic features in your area.  Warnings are being issued at increasingly fine geographic scales and usually use county names.  When you know where you are within your county and in relation to surrounding counties, you can more effectively interpret the warnings you receive, says Greg Carbin, a warning-coordination meteorologist at NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman, OK.

Indoors: Avoid windows and protect yourself from debris

If you receive a warning and you are indoors, move into the basement if you have one, or into a center hallway or windowless room as far from the home’s outside walls as possible. Duck under a sturdy piece of furniture and hang on.

Outdoors: Lie flat in the lowest spot you can find

If you receive a warning and you are outdoors, lie flat on the ground in the lowest spot you can find and cover your head with your arms.  Even a tornado’s winds slow somewhat at ground level, because of friction with the ground, Mr. Carbin explains.  If you lie low, you take advantage of that friction while presenting the wind with as little body surface to push against as possible.  You also present a much smaller target for debris.

After the twister passes…

…don’t enter damaged buildings, and stay alert for downed power lines or leaky gas mains.  Keep tuned in to weather reports, since the storm may be part of a system spawning several tornados.


Myth: If a tornado comes, it will inflict less damage if you open your windows to equalize the air pressure inside and outside the structure

Fact: Tornados hurl enough debris that few if any windows will remain intact in a building in its path.  Wind and debris damage destroy homes – not differences in air pressure inside and outside the affected building, specialists say.

Myth: If you’re caught outside when a tornado approaches, head for a highway underpass. It will shelter you.

Fact: No, it won’t.  If a tornado approaches an underpass, its intense winds will still hurl debris beneath the structure.  Laying down in a ditch or culvert will provide more protection from flying debris, according to emergency response specialists.

Myth: A tornado can’t happen here.

Fact: It may seem that way because tornadoes in a particular part of the country are rare. “But they can occur anywhere,” Carbin says, including Hawaii and Alaska.  So-called tornado alley, which runs from Texas north through the central and upper Great Plains, tends to see more activity each year than any other region.  But Florida also posts a large number of tornadoes compared with other states because of its frequent, intense summer thunderstorms as well as land-falling hurricanes, which can spawn tornadoes.

Myth: This region of the country is dangerous, because tornadoes seem to drop out of the sky each spring and summer.

Fact: Although they can be highly destructive, tornadoes everywhere are extremely rare compared with other weather hazards a location can face, Carbin says.  And they occur on small geographic scales.  Even in Oklahoma or Nebraska, “you can go a lifetime without seeing a tornado,” even if one struck a few miles away, he says.  They may be more common in some parts of the country than others, “but the probability of an event in any one location is very small,” he says.


Source Material:

  • CS Monitor Article: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2011/0428/Tornadoes-take-staggering-toll-in-Alabama-and-Deep-South-video
  • CS Monitor Article – Tornado Checklist: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2011/0418/Tornado-checklist-What-to-do-and-what-myths-to-ignore/Know-where-to-go-what-to-bring-and-who-to-tell
  • Associated Press: http://www.youtube.com/user/AssociatedPress

*Disclaimer*: The opinions expressed by the Lint Center Bloggers and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc. or any employee thereof. The Lint Center for National Security Studies, Inc. is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the Lint Center Bloggers.

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